Zincomycin

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Read drug prescription

infoIt is very important to know about what medicine is given by the doctor, for what condition, and when it needs to be taken in what dose. This information given by the doctor is called Prescription. The patients should be familiar with the medicine prescription, and the details about the medicine before purchasing it and using it. Some medications need not be prescribed by healthcare practitioners and can be purchased and used without prescription by the patients; these are called over-the-counter medications. Read the drug prescription information of Zincomycin before taking it.

consists of Gentamicin, Zinc Sulfate.

Gentamicin (Zincomycin)

What is Gentamicin (Zincomycin)

Gentamicin (Zincomycin) is an antibiotic. It fights bacteria in the body.
Gentamicin (Zincomycin) is used to treat severe or serious bacterial infections.
Gentamicin (Zincomycin) may also be used for purposes other than those listed in Gentamicin (Zincomycin) guide.

Gentamicin (Zincomycin) side effects

If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking Gentamicin (Zincomycin) and seek emergency medical attention:
  • an allergic reaction (shortness of breath; closing of the throat; hives; swelling of the lips, face, or tongue; rash; or fainting);
  • little or no urine;
  • decreased hearing or ringing in the ears;
  • dizziness, clumsiness, or unsteadiness;
  • numbness, skin tingling, muscle twitching, or seizures; or
  • severe watery diarrhea and abdominal cramps.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take Gentamicin (Zincomycin) and talk to your doctor if you experience
  • increased thirst;
  • loss of appetite;
  • nausea or vomiting;
  • a rash.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.
See also: Side effects (in more detail)
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Gentamicin (Zincomycin) dosing

Usual Adult Dose for Bacteremia:

1.5 to 2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1 to 1.7 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours or 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 24 hours
Duration of therapy: 14 days, depending on the site, nature, and severity of the bacteremia
Comments: Limiting the duration of Gentamicin therapy may help limit toxicity. Once the patient is stable for at least 48 hours, less toxic IV or oral antibiotic therapy may be considered according to microbiology sensitivity data.

Usual Adult Dose for Bacterial Endocarditis Prophylaxis:

1.5 mg/kg (maximum 120 mg) IV or IM once within 30 minutes of starting the procedure
Comments: For high risk patients, in addition to Gentamicin (Zincomycin), ampicillin 2 g is given IV or IM 30 minutes prior to the procedure, followed by ampicillin 1 g IV/IM or amoxicillin 1 g orally 6 hours later. In penicillin-allergic patients, vancomycin 1 g is infused IV 1 to 2 hours prior to the procedure.

Usual Adult Dose for Bacterial Infection:

1.5 to 2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1 to 1.7 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours, or 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 24 hours
Duration of therapy: 7 to 21 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection
Comments: Limiting the duration of Gentamicin therapy may help limit toxicity. Once the patient is stable for at least 48 hours, less toxic IV or oral antibiotic therapy may be considered according to microbiology sensitivity data.

Usual Adult Dose for Brucellosis:

2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1.7 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours or 5 mg/kg IV every 24 hours
Duration of therapy: For the first 2 to 3 weeks of antibiotic therapy
Comments: Oral doxycycline or sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim should be continued for at least 6 weeks.

Usual Adult Dose for Burns - External:

2 to 2.5 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1.7 to 2 mg/kg IV every 8 hours
Duration of therapy: 10 to 14 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

Usual Adult Dose for Cystic Fibrosis:

5 to 10 mg/kg/day in 2 to 4 divided doses
Duration of therapy: Parenteral therapy should be continued for about 14 to 21 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection and improvement of pulmonary function.

Usual Adult Dose for Endocarditis:

American Heart Association recommendations:
Native valve infections due to highly penicillin-susceptible viridans Group streptococci and S bovis (MIC <=0.12 mcg/mL): 3 mg/kg IV or IM once every 24 hours in combination with aqueous penicillin G sodium or ceftriaxone
Duration of therapy: 2 weeks; continue other antibiotic for 4 weeks
Native valve infections due to relatively penicillin-resistant S viridans and S bovis (MIC >0.12 mcg/mL and <=0.5 mcg/mL): 3 mg/kg IV or IM once every 24 hours in combination with aqueous penicillin G sodium or ceftriaxone
Duration of therapy: 2 weeks; continue other antibiotic for 4 weeks
Prosthetic valve infections due to S viridans and S bovis: 3 mg/kg IV or IM once every 24 hours in combination with aqueous penicillin G sodium or ceftriaxone
Duration of therapy: 2 weeks; continue other antibiotic for 6 weeks
Native valve infections due to staphylococci: 1.5 mg/kg IV or IM every 12 hours or 1 mg/kg every 8 hours, in combination with nafcillin, oxacillin, or cefazolin
Duration of therapy: 3 to 5 days; continue other antibiotic for 6 weeks
Prosthetic valve infections due to staphylococci: 1.5 mg/kg IV or IM every 12 hours or 1 mg/kg every 8 hours, in combination with nafcillin or oxacillin, plus rifampin, or vancomycin plus rifampin
Duration of therapy: 2 weeks; continue other antibiotics for at least 6 weeks
Native valve or prosthetic valve infections due to susceptible enterococci: 1 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours, in combination with ampicillin, aqueous penicillin G sodium, or vancomycin
Duration of therapy: 4 to 6 weeks; continue other antibiotic for 6 weeks
Native valve or prosthetic valve infections due to penicillin-resistant enterococci: 1 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours, in combination with ampicillin-sulbactam or vancomycin
Duration of therapy: 6 weeks
Comments: Refer to current published guidelines for detailed recommendations.

Usual Adult Dose for Endometritis:

2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1.5 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours
Duration of therapy: Parenteral therapy should be continued for at least 24 hours after the patient has remained afebrile, pain free, and the leukocyte count has normalized.

Usual Adult Dose for Febrile Neutropenia:

2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1.7 mg/kg IV every 8 hours
Duration of therapy: Once the patient is stable, afebrile for 24 hours, and the absolute neutrophil count is greater than 500/mm3, oral antibiotics may be substituted if antibiotic therapy is to be continued.

Usual Adult Dose for Intraabdominal Infection:

2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1.7 mg/kg IV every 8 hours or 5 mg/kg IV every 24 hours
Duration of therapy: 14 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection
Comments: Less toxic antibiotics may be substituted once the patient is stable for at least 48 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Meningitis:

2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1.7 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours
Duration of therapy: Parenteral therapy should be continued for at least 1 week after the patient becomes afebrile and cerebrospinal fluid normalizes.

Usual Adult Dose for Osteomyelitis:

1.5 to 2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1 to 1.7 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours or 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 24 hours
Duration of therapy: 4 to 6 weeks, depending on the nature and severity of the infection; chronic osteomyelitis may require an additional 1 to 2 months of oral antibiotics
Comments: Limiting the duration of Gentamicin therapy may help limit toxicity. Once the patient is stable for at least 48 hours, less toxic IV or oral antibiotic therapy may be considered according to microbiology sensitivity data.

Usual Adult Dose for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1.5 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours or 5 mg/kg IV every 24 hours
Duration of therapy: Parenteral therapy should be continued for at least 24 hours after clinical improvement and should be followed by oral doxycycline or clindamycin for a total 14 day course.

Usual Adult Dose for Peritonitis:

IV: 2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1.7 mg/kg IV every 8 hours or 5 mg/kg IV every 24 hours
Duration of therapy: Therapy should be continued for about 14 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection.
Comments: Limiting the duration of Gentamicin therapy may help limit toxicity. Once the patient is stable for at least 48 hours, less toxic IV or oral antibiotic therapy may be considered according to microbiology sensitivity data.
Intraperitoneally in CAPD patients: 0.6 to 0.75 mg/kg intraperitoneally once a day or 16 to 20 mg per every 2 L dialysate

Usual Adult Dose for Plague:

2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1.7 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours or 5 mg/kg IV every 24 hours
Duration of therapy: Therapy should be continued for about 10 to 14 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection.
Comments: Limiting the duration of Gentamicin (Zincomycin) therapy may help limit toxicity. Once the patient's condition improves, less toxic IV or oral antibiotic therapy may be considered according to microbiology sensitivity data.

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumonia:

2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1.7 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours or 5 mg/kg IV every 24 hours
Duration of therapy: Therapy should be continued for 14 to 21 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection.
Comments: Limiting the duration of Gentamicin therapy may help limit toxicity. Once the patient is stable for at least 48 hours, less toxic IV or oral antibiotic therapy may be considered according to microbiology sensitivity data.

Usual Adult Dose for Pyelonephritis:

2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1.7 mg/kg IV every 8 hours or 5 mg/kg IV every 24 hours
Duration of therapy: Therapy should be continued for about 7 to 14 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection.
Comments: Limiting the duration of Gentamicin (Zincomycin) therapy may help limit toxicity. Once the patient is stable for at least 48 hours, less toxic IV or oral antibiotic therapy may be considered according to microbiology sensitivity data.

Usual Adult Dose for Skin or Soft Tissue Infection:

1.5 to 2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1 to 1.7 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours or 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 24 hours
Duration of therapy: Therapy should be continued for at least 10 to 14 days, or until 3 days postacute inflammation, depending on the nature and severity of the infection; for severe infections, such as diabetic soft tissue infections, 14 to 21 days of therapy may be required
Comments: Limiting the duration of Gentamicin therapy may help limit toxicity. Once the patient is stable for at least 48 hours, less toxic IV or oral antibiotic therapy may be considered according to microbiology sensitivity data.

Usual Adult Dose for Surgical Prophylaxis:

1.5 to 2 mg/kg (maximum 120 mg) IV or IM once at induction of anesthesia

Usual Adult Dose for Tularemia:

1.5 to 2 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 1 to 1.7 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours or 5 to 7 mg/kg IV every 24 hours
Duration of therapy: Therapy should be continued for about 10 to 14 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection.
Comments: Once the patient's condition improves, less toxic IV or oral antibiotic therapy may be considered according to microbiology sensitivity data.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bacterial Infection:

0 to 4 weeks, birthweight <1200 g: 2.5 mg/kg IV or IM every 18 to 24 hours
0 to 1 week, birthweight >=1200 g: 2.5 mg/kg IV or IM every 12 hours
1 to 4 weeks, birthweight 1200 to 2000 g: 2.5 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 to 12 hours
1 to 4 weeks, birthweight >=2000 g: 2.5 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours
>1 month: 1 to 2.5 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bacterial Endocarditis Prophylaxis:

1.5 mg/kg IV or IM once within 30 minutes of starting the procedure
Comments: For high risk patients, in addition to Gentamicin, ampicillin 50 mg/kg (maximum 2 g) is given IV or IM 30 minutes prior to the procedure, followed by ampicillin 25 mg/kg IV/IM or amoxicillin 25 mg/kg orally 6 hours later. In penicillin-allergic patients, vancomycin 20 mg/kg IV is infused over 1 to 2 hours instead of ampicillin/amoxicillin.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Endocarditis:

AHA recommendations:
Native valve infections due to highly penicillin-susceptible viridans Group streptococci and S bovis (MIC <=0.12 mcg/mL): 3 mg/kg IV or IM once every 24 hours or 1 mg/kg every 8 hours in combination with aqueous penicillin G sodium or ceftriaxone
Duration of therapy: 2 weeks; continue other antibiotic for 4 weeks
Native valve infections due to relatively penicillin-resistant S viridans and S bovis (MIC >0.12 mcg/mL and <=0.5 mcg/mL): 3 mg/kg IV or IM once every 24 hours or 1 mg/kg every 8 hours in combination with aqueous penicillin G sodium or ceftriaxone
Duration of therapy: 2 weeks; continue other antibiotic for 4 weeks
Prosthetic valve infections due to S viridans and S bovis: 3 mg/kg IV or IM once every 24 hours or 1 mg/kg every 8 hours in combination with aqueous penicillin G sodium or ceftriaxone
Duration of therapy: 2 weeks; continue other antibiotic for 6 weeks
Native valve infections due to staphylococci: 1 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours, in combination with nafcillin, oxacillin, or cefazolin
Duration of therapy: 3 to 5 days; continue other antibiotic for 6 weeks
Prosthetic valve infections due to staphylococci: 1 mg/kg every 8 hours, in combination with nafcillin or oxacillin, plus rifampin, or vancomycin plus rifampin
Duration of therapy: 2 weeks; continue other antibiotics for at least 6 weeks
Native valve or prosthetic valve infections due to susceptible enterococci: 1 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours, in combination with ampicillin, aqueous penicillin G sodium, or vancomycin
Duration of therapy: 4 to 6 weeks; continue other antibiotic for 6 weeks
Native valve or prosthetic valve infections due to penicillin-resistant enterococci: 1 mg/kg IV or IM every 8 hours, in combination with ampicillin-sulbactam or vancomycin
Duration of therapy: 6 weeks
Comments: Refer to current published guidelines for detailed recommendations.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Surgical Prophylaxis:

2 mg/kg IV once at induction of anesthesia

Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin)

What is Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin)

Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) is a naturally occurring mineral. Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) is important for growth and for the development and health of body tissues.
Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) is used to treat and to prevent Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) deficiency.
Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) may also be used for purposes not listed in Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) guide.

Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.
Less serious side effects may include:
  • nausea; or
  • upset stomach.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.
See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) dosing

Usual Adult Dose for Dietary Supplement:

Recommended Dietary Allowance -expressed as elemental Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin):
19 years and older:
Male: 11 mg (Upper intake limit: 34 mg)
Female: 9 mg (Upper intake limit: 34 mg)
Pregnancy: 11 mg (Upper intake limit: 40 mg)
Lactation: 12 mg (Upper intake limit: 40 mg)
Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) injection: IV:
Metabolically stable adults receiving TPN: 2.5 to 4 mg zinc/day
Acute catabolic states on TPN: Additional 2 mg Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) per day is recommended.
Stable adult with fluid loss from the small bowel: Additional 12.2 mg zinc/liter of small bowel fluid lost, or an additional 17.1 mg zinc/kg of stool or ileostomy output is recommended.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Dietary Supplement:

Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA)-expressed as elemental Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin):
0 to 6 months:
Male: 2 mg (Upper intake limit: 4 mg)
Female: 2 mg (Upper intake limit: 4 mg)
7 to 12 months:
Male: 3 mg (Upper intake limit: 5 mg)
Female: 3 mg (Upper intake limit: 5 mg)
1 to 3 years:
Male: 3 mg (Upper intake limit: 7 mg)
Female: 3 mg (Upper intake limit: 7 mg)
4 to 8 years:
Male: 5 mg (Upper intake limit: 12 mg)
Female: 5 mg (Upper intake limit: 12 mg)
9 to 13 years:
Male: 8 mg (Upper intake limit: 23 mg)
Female: 8 mg (Upper intake limit: 23 mg)
14 to 18 years:
Male: 11 mg (Upper intake limit: 34 mg)
Female: 9 mg (Upper intake limit: 34 mg)
Pregnancy: 12 mg (Upper intake limit: 40 mg)
Lactation: 13 mg (Upper intake limit: 40 mg)
Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) injection: IV:
Full term infants and children up to 5 years of age: 100 mcg zinc/kg/day is recommended.
Premature infants (birth weight less than 1500 g) up to 3 kg in body weight: 300 mcg zinc/kg/day is recommended.


Select the most affordable brand or generic drug

infoGeneric drug is the basic drug with an active substance in it, and the name of the generic drug is same as active substance most of the times. Like Acetaminophen/Paracetemol is Generic name and it has different brand names like Tylenol, Acimol, Crocin, Calpol etc. All these Brand names contain the same Paracetemol, but the medications are manufactured by different companies, so the different brand names. Generic drug is always cheaper and affordable, and it can be replaced in place of brand name drug prescribed by the healthcare practitioner. The Generic medicine has same properties as branded medicine in terms of uses, indications, doses, side effects, so no need to worry on that. Just select the most affordable generic or branded medicine.

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References

  1. Dailymed."Zinc sulfate: dailymed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the united states. dailymed is the official provider of fda label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailym... (accessed August 28, 2018).
  2. Dailymed."Gentamicin sulfate: dailymed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the united states. dailymed is the official provider of fda label information (package inserts).". https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailym... (accessed August 28, 2018).
  3. "Gentamicin". https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/co... (accessed August 28, 2018).

Zincomycin - Frequently asked Questions

Can Zincomycin be stopped immediately or do I have to stop the consumption gradually to ween off?

In some cases, it always advisable to stop the intake of some medicines gradually because of the rebound effect of the medicine.

It's wise to get in touch with your doctor as a professional advice is needed in this case regarding your health, medications and further recommendation to give you a stable health condition.

How should I take Gentamicin (Zincomycin)?

If you are injecting Gentamicin (Zincomycin) at home, your healthcare provider will give you detailed instructions on how and where to inject the medication. If you do not understand these directions, do not attempt to inject the medication. Contact your healthcare provider for further instructions.

Do not use any Gentamicin (Zincomycin) that is discolored, has particles in it, or looks different from your previous doses. Throw away any unused Gentamicin (Zincomycin) after the amount of time determined by your pharmacist or doctor.

Adequate hydration is important during treatment with Gentamicin (Zincomycin). Fluids may be administered intravenously during treatment.

It is important that the medication be given on a regular schedule and for the entire amount of time prescribed by your doctor.

Gentamicin (Zincomycin) may cause damage to the kidneys and/or nerves. Kidney function and drug levels in the blood may be monitored with blood tests during treatment. Tell your doctor if you experience hearing loss, dizziness, numbness, skin tingling, muscle twitching, or seizures which may be signs of nerve damage.

Dispose of used needles and syringes in a puncture resistant container out of the reach of children.

Your healthcare provider will store Gentamicin (Zincomycin) as directed by the manufacturer or give you detailed storage instructions if you are storing the medication at home.

How should I take Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin)?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) with a full glass of water.

Take Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) with food if it upsets your stomach.

Your healthcare provider may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best result. The recommended dietary allowance of Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) changes with age. Follow your healthcare provider's instructions. You may also consult the Office of Dietary Supplements of the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Nutrient Database (formerly "Recommended Daily Allowances") listings for more information.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Who should not take Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin)?

Before using Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin), talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider. You may not be able to use Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) if you have certain medical conditions.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medicine without a doctor's advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin) passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medicine without a doctor's advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

What other drugs will affect Gentamicin (Zincomycin)?

Other drugs, especially those that affect the kidneys, can interact with Gentamicin (Zincomycin) resulting in dangerous side effects and/or decreased effectiveness. Do not take any other prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products, without first talking to your doctor during treatment with Gentamicin (Zincomycin).

What other drugs will affect Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin)?

Other drugs may interact with Zinc Sulfate (Zincomycin), including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Who should not take Gentamicin (Zincomycin)?

Do not use Gentamicin (Zincomycin) without first talking to your doctor if you have

  • sulfite sensitivity;

  • kidney disease;

  • hearing loss or loss of balance due to ear problems;

  • Parkinson's disease; or

  • a neuromuscular disorder such as myasthenia gravis.

You may not be able to use Gentamicin (Zincomycin), or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Do not use Gentamicin (Zincomycin) without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment.

Do not use Gentamicin (Zincomycin) without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Can Zincomycin be taken or consumed while pregnant?

Please visit your doctor for a recommendation as such case requires special attention.

Can Zincomycin be taken for nursing mothers or during breastfeeding?

Kindly explain your state and condition to your doctor and seek medical advice from an expert.

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Reviews

Following the study conducted by gMedication.com on Zincomycin, the result is highlighted below. However, it must be clearly stated that the survey and result is based solely on the perception and impression of visitors and users of the website as well as consumers of Zincomycin. We, therefore, urge readers not to base their medical judgment strictly on the result of this study but on test/diagnosis duly conducted by a certified medical practitioners or physician.

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How long will I use Zincomycin before I begin to notice the effect?
According to the report by users of gMedication.com, about 5 days and a few days was the most common time duration among the participants, before they began to feel relief in their health conditions. It is noteworthy that you may not get the same result with other users within the same time frame. Several factors determine the timeframe; hence we implore you to consult your medical expert to get professional advice on how long you should expect to see improvement while consuming Zincomycin. However, if you wish to get the response of other users on the time effectiveness of using Zincomycin kindly click here
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The information was verified by Dr. Harshad Shah, MD Pharmacology